Irene Adler

An adolescent, Irene Adler survived on her own in Budapest.  At one point she was rounded up and sent on a forced march out of the city, but was able to return.  Following the liberation of Budapest by the Russians in 1944, she moved to the home of her only surviving relative, an uncle.  Irene met her future husband while she was distributing sandwiches to returning camp survivors (please see Bernard Adler Interview).  She later joined Bernard in Israel where they were married in 1948 and had one son.  Irene and Bernard had a second son after their move to New York.

 

“Remembering Mother” (1984)

By Irene Adler

I. Oh how much I am thinking about you

With admiration, with love.

The years are going by, but you are always in my mind.

I never can forget you, mother.

II. From where did you take the strength?

What gave you the courage?

To love, to work, to help, to give

All your time for us, when we were in need.

III. The times were hard, there was war and

Every day was a struggle, filled with fear and hunger.

Hate surrounded us, riots and killing

From where did you take the strength mother?

IV. To stand straight, like a tree in the storm.

Give us a smile, to say a kind word.

Understand us and give a warm home.

From where did you take the strength, mother?

V. I am remembering. I see tears in your eves.

But you never complained to us

You tried to keep away the misery, the bitterness.

Oh how much did you suffer, mother?

VI. The war ended, but you never came back.

You went to Auschwitz on the train

Ended up getting killed by the enemy's hand.

But in your last hour, you were thinking of us,

What happened to your youngest children?

VII. Your teaching we remember, the kindness we practice.

What we learned from you and father,

We are believing in religion and love.

Thank you for everything, mother.

“Remembering My Father” (April 1984)

by Irene Adler

I

My Father looked up, his eyes were sad,

"1 am not ready to leave the village, my work is not yet done.

I am planting a tree; life has to go on, even if I am not here anymore.

The sun is shining, buds are on the trees, flowers, life is around us.

II

My Father's hand planted the tree;

The hand which talked without words,

The hand which gave a child a hug,

The hand which held the Torah Scrolls.

III

The hand which waved good-bye to me,

The hand which fed me when I was young;

The same hand planted the tree in the ground

With strength,that life continue, life must go on.

IV

My Father loved life.

He believed, only love he had.

He wanted the pear tree to grow and blossom,

Like a symbol of life, in misery and death.

V

The village he left with tears in his eyes.

The wagon door closed on him hard.

They took my Father to Auschwitz,

Where people suffered, where millions had died.

VI

My Father saw at Auschwitz a raised hand,

Which chose between death and life.

The hand which was a puppet of a monster's mind,

With no human feeling at all inside.

VII

My Father put his hand forward,

A gesture of a question, why?

But he never got an answer.

The monster's hand showed him he had to die.

VIII

My Father's life ended.

But his good deeds stayed on.

They could not kill his ideas, his religious beliefs,

Yes, my dear Father, religion and love will continue with future generations to come.

IX

As long as a human heart is beating,

As long as there are two outstretched hands,

As long as pear trees are growing,

As long as religion and love live in Man.

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Calendar of Events

Under Siege Again? Holocaust Distortion and the Rise of Hate Crimes Against Jews

To commemorate International Holocaust Remembrance Day and the 76th anniversary of the liberation of the Auschwitz-Birkenau extermination and concentration camp, join us for a conversation about how antisemitism at the international, national, and regional levels fuel holocaust distortion, as well as the challenges in prosecuting religiously-based hate crimes locally. Featuring Michael Brovner, Chief of the Queens County District Attorney’s Hate Crimes Bureau in New York City, and Mark Weitzman, Director of Government Affairs at the Simon Wiesenthal Center.

Please Register via Zoom at:  https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_-E2sbLFKTZOm08NuRWn1Vg

Lessons of White Nationalism, Racism, and Government

The Holocaust, Genocide and Interfaith Education Center invites you to an interdisciplinary Teach-In with faculty and students on Feb. 2nd at 7 pm: "Lessons of White Nationalism, Racism, and Government,” featuring; Rev. Thomas Franks, Rev. Dr. Courtney Bryant, Dr. Jonathan Keller, and Dr. Jeff Horn. They will speak for ten minutes each followed by questions and discussion. The United States faces a reckoning: serious issues divide Americans. Blatant racism, sexism, Antisemitism, Islamophobia, and violence are constantly on display. However, this nation has pledged that the respect and care of every living being and non-violent change can unite us in our democratic values. As John F. Kennedy said in 1961, “Let both sides explore what problems unite us.” We must seek understanding to face the challenges of our time. At Manhattan College, we seek dialogue, and the critical exchange of ideas as we engage with one another equally and dream of a better future. In keeping with Lasallian values, the Manhattan College community will redouble educational efforts for our students to undertake campus-wide reflection on teaching and our core values of civic responsibility, racial justice, and moral integrity. This Interdisciplinary Teach-In is a forum with expert faculty from Manhattan College; Campus Ministry and Social Action, History, Political Science and Religious Studies. Student representatives will submit questions beforehand to ensure the inclusion of student voices in this forum. Please join us via google meet: https://tinyurl.com/teachinfeb2 Please submit questions for Q&A: https://tinyurl.com/hgiquestions

Feb17

Who Is My Neighbor?: Race, Culture, and American Life

The Judith Plaskow Lecture of Women and Religion will be presented by M. Shawn Copeland, Ph.D., Professor Emerita of Theology at Boston College. This lecture interprets the ‘Parable of the Good Samaritan’ as told by the Jewish rabbi Jesus of Nazareth and recorded in the Christian Scriptures in order to probe its usefulness for contemporary living. Civility, decency, respect, along with basic democratic values seem to be under assault around the globe. Perhaps, critical consideration of the basic command––to love one’s neighbor as oneself––might help us recover “the better angels of our nature.”

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