Genocide Framework

Genocide is a term created during the Holocaust and declared an international crime in the 1948 United Nations Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide. The Convention defines genocide as any of the following acts committed with the intent to destroy, in whole or in part, a national, ethnical, racial or religious group, as such:

a. Killing members of the group;
b. Causing serious bodily or mental harm to members of the group;
c. Deliberately inflicting on the group conditions of life calculated to bring about its physical destruction in whole or in part;
d. Imposing measures intended to prevent births within the group;
e. Forcibly transferring children of the group to another group.

The specific "intent to destroy" particular groups is unique to genocide. A closely related category of international law, crimes against humanity, is defined as widespread or systematic attacks against civilians.

This timeline traces the development of the word and law of genocide.

 

 

http://www.savedarfur.org/

 

http://www.savedarfur.org/

http://www.armenian-genocide.org/

http://worldwithoutgenocide.org/past-genocides/bosnian-genocide

 

We strive to have a world without Genocide raise awareness about current situations of mass violence and human rights offenses. By learning about these areas of conflict and acting early to resolve them, We hope to educate and stop them from becoming full-out genocides.

The Following is from World Without Genocide:

World identifies a potential genocide by closely examining the dynamics of human rights violations in each situation, and comparing them to the Eight Stages of Genocide, as identified by Gregory Stanton.

Eight Stages of Genocide:

1. Classification: Categories of “us” versus “them” are identified based on ethnicity, race, religion, or nationality.

Yellow Star

2. Symbolization: Names or symbols are given to the classified categories. An example includes the yellow star for Jewish people during the Holocaust. Symbolization does not typically result in genocide unless it is accompanied by dehumanization.

Anti-Jewish Propaganda

3. Dehumanization: One group denies the humanity of the other group by equating them with animals, insects, or diseases. This eliminates the normal human revulsion against murder and makes killing someone of the other group as easy as stepping on a bug.

4. Organization: Governments, armies, or other groups of power unite and train militias to carry out the genocide.

5. Polarization: Extremists further drive the two groups apart by spreading propaganda, limiting contact between them, or creating laws to ostracize one of the groups.

Nazi Death List

6. Preparation: Victims are identified and separated. Death lists are drawn up. Weapons are distributed.

7. Extermination: Mass killing of the identified victims begins. At this point, killing is easy and the extermination is quick.

8. Denial: Perpetrators of the genocide try to cover up mass killings and intimidate witnesses.They deny that they committed any crimes, and try to blame what happened on the victims. 

 

 

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Calendar of Events

Under Siege Again? Holocaust Distortion and the Rise of Hate Crimes Against Jews

To commemorate International Holocaust Remembrance Day and the 76th anniversary of the liberation of the Auschwitz-Birkenau extermination and concentration camp, join us for a conversation about how antisemitism at the international, national, and regional levels fuel holocaust distortion, as well as the challenges in prosecuting religiously-based hate crimes locally. Featuring Michael Brovner, Chief of the Queens County District Attorney’s Hate Crimes Bureau in New York City, and Mark Weitzman, Director of Government Affairs at the Simon Wiesenthal Center.

Please Register via Zoom at:  https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_-E2sbLFKTZOm08NuRWn1Vg

Lessons of White Nationalism, Racism, and Government

The Holocaust, Genocide and Interfaith Education Center invites you to an interdisciplinary Teach-In with faculty and students on Feb. 2nd at 7 pm: "Lessons of White Nationalism, Racism, and Government,” featuring; Rev. Thomas Franks, Rev. Dr. Courtney Bryant, Dr. Jonathan Keller, and Dr. Jeff Horn. They will speak for ten minutes each followed by questions and discussion. The United States faces a reckoning: serious issues divide Americans. Blatant racism, sexism, Antisemitism, Islamophobia, and violence are constantly on display. However, this nation has pledged that the respect and care of every living being and non-violent change can unite us in our democratic values. As John F. Kennedy said in 1961, “Let both sides explore what problems unite us.” We must seek understanding to face the challenges of our time. At Manhattan College, we seek dialogue, and the critical exchange of ideas as we engage with one another equally and dream of a better future. In keeping with Lasallian values, the Manhattan College community will redouble educational efforts for our students to undertake campus-wide reflection on teaching and our core values of civic responsibility, racial justice, and moral integrity. This Interdisciplinary Teach-In is a forum with expert faculty from Manhattan College; Campus Ministry and Social Action, History, Political Science and Religious Studies. Student representatives will submit questions beforehand to ensure the inclusion of student voices in this forum. Please join us via google meet: https://tinyurl.com/teachinfeb2 Please submit questions for Q&A: https://tinyurl.com/hgiquestions

Feb17

Who Is My Neighbor?: Race, Culture, and American Life

The Judith Plaskow Lecture of Women and Religion will be presented by M. Shawn Copeland, Ph.D., Professor Emerita of Theology at Boston College. This lecture interprets the ‘Parable of the Good Samaritan’ as told by the Jewish rabbi Jesus of Nazareth and recorded in the Christian Scriptures in order to probe its usefulness for contemporary living. Civility, decency, respect, along with basic democratic values seem to be under assault around the globe. Perhaps, critical consideration of the basic command––to love one’s neighbor as oneself––might help us recover “the better angels of our nature.”

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