The Holocaust, Genocide and Interfaith Education Center at  Manhattan College 

        We are an academic educational center located at Manhattan College, NewYork.  Our goal is to help eradicate human suffering, prejudice, and racism through education. We condemn all violence in the name of race, religion, ethnicity and gender. We invite you to attend our educational, artistic and interfaith events.  Please be part of our center and its community in New York.

 Center's Mission

     The Center’s mission is to promote Jewish-Catholic-Muslim “discussion and collaboration” as urged in 1965 by the Vatican’s Nostra Aetate (In Our Time) and seconded in subsequent Papal actions and declarations. “Since Christians and Jews have such a common spiritual heritage, this sacred Council wishes to encourage and further mutual understanding and appreciation.” Nostra Aetate also states that the Church “regards with esteem also the Muslim,” and it urges all “to work sincerely for mutual understanding.”

    As befits Manhattan College, an institution of higher education, the Center’s principal sphere is education. Founded in 1996 as the Holocaust Resource Center, the Center expanded its Mission in 2011 and was renamed the Holocaust, Genocide and Interfaith Education Center. This reflects the spirit of the Center’s Mission and the vision that all the foci are interconnected and are part of the educational outreach of the Center. The Center is committed to understanding and respecting differences and similarities between people of all religions, races, ethnicities and nationalities.

     The Center’s focus remains the lessons of the Holocaust, which are essential to educating future generations in order to combat prejudice, genocidal ideologies, apathy and Holocaust denial. To this end, the Center is committed to educating people about the Holocaust and genocide while emphasizing the contemporary significance of these events. Although the primary audiences are the College community, the neighborhood and area teachers, the Center also seeks to impact a broader arena through interfaith initiatives and activities. Through education about human suffering in the absence of tolerance, the Center seeks to foster acceptance and understanding among religions, cultures, and communities.

We are located in O'Malley Library in rooms 502, 503 and 504.  

 

 

Statement on January 6th events on Capitol Hill:

 

The Holocaust, Genocide, and Interfaith Education Center at Manhattan College is committed to the eradication of human suffering and racism.  The Center’s focus remains the lessons of the Holocaust, which are essential to educating future generations in order to combat prejudice, genocidal ideologies, apathy and Holocaust denial. To this end, the Center is committed to educating people about the Holocaust and genocide while emphasizing the contemporary significance of these events.

We judge any praise that any leader or group describing Adolf Hitler as being right or justified as dangerous.  Adolf Hitler’s Germany proved to be one of the darkest and destructive times in human history with the advent of World War II and the Holocaust resulting in the genocide of six million European Jews. 

We condemn the white nationalist and extremist groups that have used their platform to propel Antisemitism and used Holocaust imagery in the most inappropriate way. 

We condemn the severe racism against Black Americans.

We condemn the destruction and desecration of American federal property and any other property.

We ask for peace and solidarity but more importantly love, empathy, and care for one another on our campus, communities, and nation. As our Lasallian values teach us, we have to give respect and dignity for all persons in order to build an Inclusive Community.

 

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Calendar of Events

"Witnessing the Destruction of Culture by ISIS"

Zoom

In collaboration with the UNO School of the Arts Gallery and the Sam and Frances Fried Holocaust and Genocide Academy exhibit titled Nobody’s Listening, Piers Secunda's lecture will describe how his abstract painting practice changed direction 20 years ago and became an examination of the destruction of culture. His work has been exhibited internationally since the mid 90s, was used as a tool of diplomacy between warring factions in Iraq in 2018 and is in the collections of the Victoria and Albert Museum, London, The Iraq National Museum, Baghdad, and on permanent display at the Ashmolean Museum at Oxford University — the oldest Museum in the world.

This program is organized and hosted by UNO's School of Arts and the Sam and Frances Fried Holocaust and Genocide Academy and co-sponsored by the Holocaust, Genocide, and Interfaith Education Center at Manhattan College; Center for Genocide and Human Rights Research in Africa and the Diaspora at Northeastern Illinois University; The Ray Wolpow Institute for the Study of the Holocaust, Genocide, and Crimes Against Humanity at Western Washington University.

Feb8

"Deconstructing Atrocity Imagery: A Conversation with Dr. Wendy Lower"

Zoom

In her latest book, The Ravine: A Family: A Photograph, a Holocaust Massacre Revealed, Dr. Wendy Lower, Professor of History at Claremont McKenna College, observes that in the aftermath of World War II, “Eisenhower ordered that visual evidence be collected to guard against forgetting and disbelief." In this lecture, Dr. Lower shares her investigation of a single photograph—a rare “action shot” documenting the horrific final moment of a family’s murder in Ukraine. Through years of forensic and archival research, Lower sought to uncover the identities of the photographed and in the process recovered new details about the Nazis’ open-air massacres in eastern Europe, the role of the family unit in Nazi ideology, and a rare case of rescue and postwar justice.

This event is part of the 2022-23 Harriet & Kenneth Kupferberg Holocaust Center (KHC) and National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) Colloquium, “Trauma, Remembrance, and Compassion.” The event is organized by the KHC at Queensborough Community College and is co-sponsored by the Ray Wolpow Institute at Western Washington University; the Holocaust, Genocide and Interfaith Education Center at Manhattan College; and the Center for the Study of Genocide and Human Rights at Rutgers University.

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