International Holocaust Remembrance Day

Thursday, January 26th at 6 pm

In partnership with the Kupferberg Holocaust Center at Queensborough Community College. The featured speaker is Ellen Germain (IHRA state dept. envoy). She will discuss the ongoing importance and connections between Holocaust restitution claims/education and contemporary foreign policy.  

"Witnessing the Destruction of Culture by ISIS"

Monday, February 6th at 6:30 pm

In collaboration with the UNO School of the Arts Gallery and the Sam and Frances Fried Holocaust and Genocide Academy exhibit titled Nobody’s Listening, Piers Secunda's lecture will describe how his abstract painting practice changed direction 20 years ago and became an examination of the destruction of culture. His work has been exhibited internationally since the mid 90s, was used as a tool of diplomacy between warring factions in Iraq in 2018 and is in the collections of the Victoria and Albert Museum, London, The Iraq National Museum, Baghdad, and on permanent display at the Ashmolean Museum at Oxford University — the oldest Museum in the world.

This program is organized and hosted by UNO's School of Arts and the Sam and Frances Fried Holocaust and Genocide Academy and co-sponsored by the Holocaust, Genocide, and Interfaith Education Center at Manhattan College; Center for Genocide and Human Rights Research in Africa and the Diaspora at Northeastern Illinois University; The Ray Wolpow Institute for the Study of the Holocaust, Genocide, and Crimes Against Humanity at Western Washington University.

"Deconstructing Atrocity Imagery: A Conversation with Dr. Wendy Lower"

Wednesday, February 8th at 12 pm on Zoom

In her latest book, The Ravine: A Family: A Photograph, a Holocaust Massacre Revealed, Dr. Wendy Lower, Professor of History at Claremont McKenna College, observes that in the aftermath of World War II, “Eisenhower ordered that visual evidence be collected to guard against forgetting and disbelief." In this lecture, Dr. Lower shares her investigation of a single photograph—a rare “action shot” documenting the horrific final moment of a family’s murder in Ukraine. Through years of forensic and archival research, Lower sought to uncover the identities of the photographed and in the process recovered new details about the Nazis’ open-air massacres in eastern Europe, the role of the family unit in Nazi ideology, and a rare case of rescue and postwar justice.

This event is part of the 2022-23 Harriet & Kenneth Kupferberg Holocaust Center (KHC) and National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) Colloquium, “Trauma, Remembrance, and Compassion.” The event is organized by the KHC at Queensborough Community College and is co-sponsored by the Ray Wolpow Institute at Western Washington University; the Holocaust, Genocide and Interfaith Education Center at Manhattan College; and the Center for the Study of Genocide and Human Rights at Rutgers University.

"Rescued from the Darkness: The Inspiring True Story of Pope John II School in the Luweero Triangle of Central Uganda"

Wednesday, February 15th at 4 pm in Hayden 100

The producer and director, Dan Tarrant, will introduce the film and have a Q&A following it. The film shows a faith-based response to war and genocide in a complex society that continues to have religious and political contention.

"Surviving the Taliban Takeover in Afghanistan: Sohaila Kakar's Refugee Journey"

Wednesday, February 22nd at 12 pm on Zoom

In Afghanistan, Sohaila Kakar was a practicing surgeon; then, in 2021, the Taliban took over the country. Join us as Sohaila discusses life before and after the Taliban's takeover in Afghanistan–and the physical, economic, and psychological toll it had upon her family as they fled. Her story also highlights the compassionate work done by Upwardly Global, the non-profit agency that provided guidance to Sohaila’s family as they settled in the U.S.

This event is part of the 2022-23 Harriet & Kenneth Kupferberg Holocaust Center (KHC) and National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) Colloquium, “Trauma, Remembrance, and Compassion.” The event is organized by the KHC at Queensborough Community College and is co-sponsored by the Ray Wolpow Institute at Western Washington University; the Holocaust, Genocide and Interfaith Education Center at Manhattan College; and the Center for the Study of Genocide and Human Rights at Rutgers University.

"Turbans and Beards, Happiness and Justice: Tapping Sikh Wisdom to Meet Our Challenges"

Thursday, March 2nd at 7pm in Kelly Commons 5C

The featured speaker is Dr. Simran Jeet Singh. Dr. Singh is the Executive Director of the Aspen Institute for Religion and Society. Dr. Singh will discuss his book "The Light We Give", a book on the wisdom of Sikhism about overcoming racism and fear through optimism and connection. As turban-wearing Sikhs growing up in Texas, Dr. Singh and his brothers faced racism daily. On the soccer field, on the basketball court, and especially at the airport. Over the years, Dr. Singh learned that the same tradition that caused him to look different had unique wisdom for confronting the challenges of our time. 

80 Year Anniversary of the Warsaw Ghetto

Tuesday, March 21st at 7pm in Kelly Commons 5C

The featured speaker is Dr. Zachary Mazur. Dr. Mazur is a Senior Historian at the Polin Museum of Jews in Warsaw, Poland.  

Yom HaShoah

Thursday, April 20th at 7pm in Kelly Commons 5A

The featured speaker is Adi Rabinowitz Bedein. Adi is a young activist who lives in Israel and is tour guide at Yad Vashem, she will lecture ob: "Jewish Resistance During the Holocaust- True Heroism". During the Holocaust, the Jewish people were facing 3 options: passivity, collaboration, and resistance. In the lecture about resistance during the Holocaust, Adi will discuss the meaning of Jewish resistance being a story of strength and true heroism which can teach us so much that is relevant for our everyday life. 

"Profiles of Peace"

Wednesday, April 26th at 6 pm in Kelly Commons 4C

The featured speaker is Rabbi Dr. Ron Kronish. Rabbi Dr. Kronish is the founding director of the Interreligious Coordinating Council in Israel (ICCI) and now is an independent scholar, educator, speaker, and writer.  His new book is "Profiles in Peace" discussing Israeli and Palestinian Peacemakers. Rabbi Dr. Kronish, for the past several years, has been a Library Fellow at the Van Leer Jerusalem Institute. From 1991-2015, he served as the Founder and Director if the Interreligious Coordinating Council in Israel (ICCI), which was Israel's premier interreligious institution during those years. He was educated at Brandeis University (BA), Hebrew Union College, and the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is the editor of Coexistence and Reconciliation in Israel: Voices for Interreligious Dialogue (Paulist Press, 2015) and the author of multiple books. He currently teaches courses about Interreligious Dialogue and Peacebuilding at the Schechter Institutes for Jewish Studies in Jerusalem, in the Department for Adult Education and for the Drew University Theological School in Madison, NJ.