The Holocaust, Genocide and Interfaith Education Center at  Manhattan College 

        We are an academic educational center located at Manhattan College, NewYork.  Our goal is to help eradicate human suffering, prejudice, and racism through education. We condemn all violence in the name of race, religion, ethnicity and gender. We invite you to attend our educational, artistic and interfaith events.  Please be part of our center and its community in New York.

 Center's Mission

     The Center’s mission is to promote Jewish-Catholic-Muslim “discussion and collaboration” as urged in 1965 by the Vatican’s Nostra Aetate (In Our Time) and seconded in subsequent Papal actions and declarations. “Since Christians and Jews have such a common spiritual heritage, this sacred Council wishes to encourage and further mutual understanding and appreciation.” Nostra Aetate also states that the Church “regards with esteem also the Muslim,” and it urges all “to work sincerely for mutual understanding.”

    As befits Manhattan College, an institution of higher education, the Center’s principal sphere is education. Founded in 1996 as the Holocaust Resource Center, the Center expanded its Mission in 2011 and was renamed the Holocaust, Genocide and Interfaith Education Center. This reflects the spirit of the Center’s Mission and the vision that all the foci are interconnected and are part of the educational outreach of the Center. The Center is committed to understanding and respecting differences and similarities between people of all religions, races, ethnicities and nationalities.

     The Center’s focus remains the lessons of the Holocaust, which are essential to educating future generations in order to combat prejudice, genocidal ideologies, apathy and Holocaust denial. To this end, the Center is committed to educating people about the Holocaust and genocide while emphasizing the contemporary significance of these events. Although the primary audiences are the College community, the neighborhood and area teachers, the Center also seeks to impact a broader arena through interfaith initiatives and activities. Through education about human suffering in the absence of tolerance, the Center seeks to foster acceptance and understanding among religions, cultures, and communities.

We are located in O'Malley Library in rooms 502, 503 and 504.  

View our Fall 2020 Events HERE

 

Statement on January 6th events on Capitol Hill:

 

The Holocaust, Genocide, and Interfaith Education Center at Manhattan College is committed to the eradication of human suffering and racism.  The Center’s focus remains the lessons of the Holocaust, which are essential to educating future generations in order to combat prejudice, genocidal ideologies, apathy and Holocaust denial. To this end, the Center is committed to educating people about the Holocaust and genocide while emphasizing the contemporary significance of these events.

We judge any praise that any leader or group describing Adolf Hitler as being right or justified as dangerous.  Adolf Hitler’s Germany proved to be one of the darkest and destructive times in human history with the advent of World War II and the Holocaust resulting in the genocide of six million European Jews. 

We condemn the white nationalist and extremist groups that have used their platform to propel Antisemitism and used Holocaust imagery in the most inappropriate way. 

We condemn the severe racism against Black Americans.

We condemn the destruction and desecration of American federal property and any other property.

We ask for peace and solidarity but more importantly love, empathy, and care for one another on our campus, communities, and nation. As our Lasallian values teach us, we have to give respect and dignity for all persons in order to build an Inclusive Community.

 

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Calendar of Events

Under Siege Again? Holocaust Distortion and the Rise of Hate Crimes Against Jews

To commemorate International Holocaust Remembrance Day and the 76th anniversary of the liberation of the Auschwitz-Birkenau extermination and concentration camp, join us for a conversation about how antisemitism at the international, national, and regional levels fuel holocaust distortion, as well as the challenges in prosecuting religiously-based hate crimes locally. Featuring Michael Brovner, Chief of the Queens County District Attorney’s Hate Crimes Bureau in New York City, and Mark Weitzman, Director of Government Affairs at the Simon Wiesenthal Center.

Please Register via Zoom at:  https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_-E2sbLFKTZOm08NuRWn1Vg

Lessons of White Nationalism, Racism, and Government

The Holocaust, Genocide and Interfaith Education Center invites you to an interdisciplinary Teach-In with faculty and students on Feb. 2nd at 7 pm: "Lessons of White Nationalism, Racism, and Government,” featuring; Rev. Thomas Franks, Rev. Dr. Courtney Bryant, Dr. Jonathan Keller, and Dr. Jeff Horn. They will speak for ten minutes each followed by questions and discussion. The United States faces a reckoning: serious issues divide Americans. Blatant racism, sexism, Antisemitism, Islamophobia, and violence are constantly on display. However, this nation has pledged that the respect and care of every living being and non-violent change can unite us in our democratic values. As John F. Kennedy said in 1961, “Let both sides explore what problems unite us.” We must seek understanding to face the challenges of our time. At Manhattan College, we seek dialogue, and the critical exchange of ideas as we engage with one another equally and dream of a better future. In keeping with Lasallian values, the Manhattan College community will redouble educational efforts for our students to undertake campus-wide reflection on teaching and our core values of civic responsibility, racial justice, and moral integrity. This Interdisciplinary Teach-In is a forum with expert faculty from Manhattan College; Campus Ministry and Social Action, History, Political Science and Religious Studies. Student representatives will submit questions beforehand to ensure the inclusion of student voices in this forum. Please join us via google meet: https://tinyurl.com/teachinfeb2 Please submit questions for Q&A: https://tinyurl.com/hgiquestions

Feb17

Who Is My Neighbor?: Race, Culture, and American Life

The Judith Plaskow Lecture of Women and Religion will be presented by M. Shawn Copeland, Ph.D., Professor Emerita of Theology at Boston College. This lecture interprets the ‘Parable of the Good Samaritan’ as told by the Jewish rabbi Jesus of Nazareth and recorded in the Christian Scriptures in order to probe its usefulness for contemporary living. Civility, decency, respect, along with basic democratic values seem to be under assault around the globe. Perhaps, critical consideration of the basic command––to love one’s neighbor as oneself––might help us recover “the better angels of our nature.”

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